Benjamin Brown

Benjamin Brown

More Than Tor: 
Shining a Light on Different Corners of the Dark Web

When the terms darknet or dark web are invoked it is almost always in reference to the Tor network, but what about the other extant darknet frameworks? A true understanding of the dark web would be impossible and misleading if it only included the Tor network. In this talk I will expand the field of view to include frameworks such as Freenet, I2P, and OpenBazaar. We’ll take a quick look at the origins and technical underpinnings of these darknets as well as their actors and offerings. I will also discuss the differentiators that set these networks apart from Tor and highlight why they too should be included in modeling our knowledge of the dark web. Audience members will walk away with a fuller understanding of the internet’s hidden corners, the goals of its users, and the technologies that help keep them in the dark.


Matthew Werner

Matthew Werner

Engineering Manager – Crypto Payments

Anatomy of a Hotwallet – Bitcoin at Scale
Coinbase has become one of the leading cryptocurrency exchanges in the world. The systems we’ve built to satisfy the increasing volume of sends and receives on a variety of blockchains is called our “hot wallet”. Operating these systems require special technical expertise and a strong understanding of the nuances of these new technologies. This talk describes how the systems operate, challenges we’ve faced, and how we’ve overcome these constraints to provide our customers with a world-class cryptocurrency product. The talk will include topics such as fee estimation, coin selection, change splitting, UTXO consolidation, and child pays for parent.

James Arndt

James Arndt

Always Look a Gift (Trojan) Horse in the Mouth

It could be said that the city of Troy needed to update its antivirus or intrusion detection signatures. Maybe they needed to dust off their acceptable use policy on their SharePoint site? Or did their end users need more security training? Didn’t anyone warn the CEO of Troy that it is dangerous to push the “Enable Content” button on strange horses that show up outside the city wall? If only the city of Troy had a citizen that could have torn apart the Trojan Horse to see what was really going on inside.
The same goes for malicious emails. Someone will report a suspicious email because they think it might be malicious. But how bad is it really? Unless you are able to dig into the email and perform a thorough analysis on its attachments, you’ll never know how bad it is, how it behaves, and what it may be trying to contact.
In this talk, attendees will learn various tools and techniques that can be used to thoroughly analyze a malicous attachment and everything that comes after it. In order to get as many stones as possible, we will want to leave no stone unturned. This information can then be used to look for indicators of compromise throughout your environment.

Dustin Heywood (EvilMog)

Dustin Heywood (EvilMog)

Automating Hashtopolis

This talk will cover the basics of using the Hashtopolis user-api to automate functions in Hashtopolis. This talk will cover connecting to an HTP instance, creating hashlists, creating attacks, recovering plaintext, user creation and more.

Ian Sindermann

Ian Sindermann

Unhinging Security on the Buffalo TeraStation NAS

Often times it only takes a small oversight to cause a vulnerability, even when it comes to severe vulnerabilities. The Buffalo TeraStation NAS demonstrates this idea beautifully in that it has a variety of features that do just a tad more than they should. Using these oversights as examples, I’ll provide an overview of the thought processes, mindset, and skills used to turn happy little oversights into happy little shells. There will be an abundance of facepalms and IoT war stories, and if that wasn’t enough, there’s a good chance these vulns will still be unpatched.


Ed Skoudis

Ed Skoudis

KeyNote: Ed Skoudis

TBA


Arden Meyer

Arden Meyer

Privilege Escalation in Mechanical Master-Key Systems

The mechanical pin and tumbler locks we use on our homes, schools, and businesses have not changed much in over 100 years. Sure, there have been some exotic new designs but most are just not fiscally feasible compared to their relatively minor improvements (if any) in security. A feature desired on large scale deployments is called Master Keying, which allows for many unique key/lock combinations while supporting multiple permission levels commonly referred to as “janitor keys” or “security keys” that can open multiple locks. While these systems are still in use around the globe in medium-to-large scale businesses, schools, and government buildings, they are also susceptible to what some consider to be the original privilege escalation attack. We will talk about an optimization attack against the most common master keyed lock systems in use today, reducing the potential attack surface from 1,000,000 permutations for an SC4 keyway system down to 42 steps to find the highest privilege key.


Cindy Murphy

Cindy Murphy

KeyNote: Cindy Murphy

TBA


Vi Grey

Vi Grey

Bet You Never Played an NES Game like This: Innovating Under Limitations

We all know someone who has a Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) sitting around collecting dust.  The 1980s gaming console was limited in its capabilities, but just how much wiggle room does that leave for mischief?  In this talk, Vi Grey will demonstrate how it is possible to innovate under the limitations the NES restricts us with to create new ways a person can interact with a game.  You will see NES games that are also fully functioning web pages and ZIP files, console memory dumps that can be opened as JPEG images, game cartridges that secretly contain other entire NES games, and much more.


Stephanie

Stephanie "Snow" Carruthers

Everything old is new again: A look at historic cons and their transition to a digital world

What does a pig in a poke, pigeon drops, and salting have in common? They are just a few of old school confidence tricks (cons) used from the late middle ages to more recently which swindled marks out of money. In this presentation Stephanie will cover how some famous historic cons were used in their day, and how they are now being transitioned into today’s digital world.


Keenan Skelly

Keenan Skelly

Beat the APTs: Explore Digital Forensics through Gamified Cyber Learning

Ever cyber professional wants to stop an APT from hurting their company. But when they can’t stop an attack, they seek to expose the criminal, so they can learn from the incident and identify preventative measures. To beat the bad guys and keep pace with today’s evolving cyberattacks, we need an equally dynamic, adaptive, and engaging cybersecurity skills strategy to save our enterprises. Digital forensics—the process of identifying, preserving, analyzing, and presenting digital evidence—is one of many cyber skills necessary in today’s hacking culture.

To support this discipline, Keenan will share how gamified cyber range environments are emerging to assist investigators in the capture, analysis, and preservation of evidence. She will explain how these virtual environments can deliver realistic cybersecurity scenarios for professionals to train both individual and overall team competencies. Keenan will share how users can engage in life-like cyber scenarios inspired by modern-day hacking events to not only refine digital forensic investigation processes but also help professionals learn from beginning to end how and why a hacker attacks in the first place.

Keenan will explain the benefits of gamified cyber range learning and how it can benefit cyber teams. As a result of this new game-inspired learning method, digital forensic professionals gain the ability to “beat the hacker” at their own game—through a game-like cyber range that most authentically represents future scenarios they will encounter. Cyber professionals can learn new, more efficient approaches to deploying computer/network/mobile digital forensics leveraging real-world examples of incidents. Further, gamifying cybersecurity exercises allows teams to better protect enterprises from future attacks and bring cybercriminals to justice.


Josh Bressers

Josh Bressers

Spelunking the Bitcoin blockchain

There are few topics that capture the imagination and headlines like Bitcoin. Many of us understand what Bitcoin is and how it works on a technical level. Bitcoin’s blockchain is a bit like art; sometime you just have to see it with your own eyes.
What if we use modern big data tools to store the blockchain data in a format that can be searched, viewed, and explored? Once you can see the data you can start to discover what Bitcoin is and how it works. It stops being ones and zeros and becomes a story we can watch unfold.
We tend to think about Bitcoin in the context of moving coins around. The coins that get mined and traded are certainly interesting but they’re not the whole story. There are plenty of other interesting aspects in the Bitcoin data. Watching the difficulty of the work, seeing how time of day and seasons affect the transactions flowing through the system. Even understanding what some of the upper bounds on what Bitcoin will be able to accomplish are. We can explore this data in a visual way that can be understood.
The most interesting part of Bitcoin isn’t the coin however. It’s something called nonstandard transactions. Most transactions in the blockchain are strings of data that move coins around. But a transaction isn’t limited to only moving around coins, it can be any random string of data. There are a substantial number of transactions that contain unique and interesting strings. Strings that don’t move the coins around, strings that contain messages. Strange things that only the anonymous person who placed it there may ever understand. There are hundreds of thousands of nonstandard transactions in Bitcoin’s blockchain. We have the ability to see them now, it feels like finding a secret note someone left behind.
Let’s spend some time looking at all this data. What can we learn about how Bitcoin works. What are some trends we’re seeing. And most importantly what are some of the secrets the blockchain holds for us to find. The best part is everything we look at is open data and all the tools we use are open source. You can continue the investigation on your own using what you learn in this session as your inspiration and guide.