Aamil Karimi

Qualitative Analysis for Critical, Timely Intelligence

Every day, researchers and analysts are bombarded with new sets of data and information pertaining to threats and adversaries. This is not very different from what intelligence analysts encounter in physical terrain warfare. In both cases, intelligence can only succeed in looking beyond the flavor of the week by applying timely, qualitative analysis to relevant information. In this presentation we will discuss:

Examples of observing common and older tactics and vulnerabilities that are actively being leveraged (instead of theoretical risks)
Using historical information to make well-informed assessments of future adversary courses of action
Applying qualitative-based risk assessments to adversaries based on observed capabilities and intent
Utilizing non-technical methods of intelligence collection such as human intelligence

We’ll also walk through real-life examples, including our hands-on experience in confirming tactics used by hacktivists during an actual campaign, and tracing suspected ties between a Middle Eastern paramilitary organization and a domestic cyber adversary.


Jo Jones

Jo Jones

Duck and Cover 2.0: How Preparing for the End of the World Can Prepare You for Anything

Even though the Cold War ended almost 30 years ago, there are still a lot of valuable lessons that can be learned from that era. One of the hallmarks of Civil Defense was to prepare yourself and your family for the coming Nuclear War. There were thousands of pamphlets, ads and movies created to teach people how to survive and thrive when Mutually Assured Destruction came to fruition. In this presentation, I will go over some of the more famous Civil Defense campaigns of the Cold War and how you can apply these tips to keep yourself and your companies safe in the modern world.


Byron Franz

Byron Franz

The FBI Wants You! (To help in Protecting the U.S. From Cyberattacks)

System Administrators, information security professionals, and ethical hackers are often the first line of defense in protecting U.S. companies and public institutions from cyberattacks.  However, there are local, state, and federal resources available to assist in mitigating and investigating a cyber incident.  Presidential Policy Directive 41 (PPD-41) established the FBI as the lead federal agency for cyber threat response activities in the U.S.  How does the FBI conduct this threat response?  This presentation will discuss various cyber threats to U.S. institutions, seek to dispel various myths about the FBI’s cyber efforts, and seek to clarify what an institution can expect when contacting the FBI to report a computer intrusion, ransomware attack, or other incident.  Special Agent Franz will also discuss the vital importance in IT professionals both reporting IOCs to the FBI and considering applying for an FBI Special Agent, Intelligence Analyst, or related position to bolster the U.S.’ national  cyber defense capabilities.